Crown Molding

Crown molding, also referred to as crown molding, or cornice, is probably the most important architectural accent used to detail any interior space. Most interior designers today would agree that every room can be improved with the use of crown molding. Crown molding smooths the transition from the wall to the ceiling and does a wonderful job of defining the architectural style of a room. The size and style of crown molding used may vary widely, from a simple cove in a farmhouse kitchen to a large built-up cornice in a grand entry.

 

The initial use of a cornice in building design is anyone's guess. By the time the ancient Greeks had gained power, rules had already been created to define the use and design of crown molding. Originally, it was used as a structural element to help support the weight of the roof. It also served to keep water away from the building, thus protecting the lower walls and the foundation. However, the use of cornice as a decorative element was not considered any less important than it's more utilitarian functions. Most of the ornamental design patterns that you see on today's crown molding originated from the ancient Greeks. Egg and dart, Dentil and acanthus leaf are the most obvious examples and these were used extensively in ancient times by both the Greeks and the Romans.

Create a beautiful room with Primed MDF molding.  Known for consistency, ease of handling and superior paint adhesion, Primed MDF is available from Precision Fit Doors and Windows in many profiles of base, casing and crown moldings, and chair rails.

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Wall Molding

Wall moldings. This group includes the chair rails, and the less common picture rails and friezes. Chair rails are popular features and so can be found throughout many homes. It is the molding that sits approximately 30"-36" above the floor, right at about the height of a chair back. If you choose to panel the wall below, this trim is known as a dado cap.

 

Picture rails and friezes are often confused, while in actuality they are two separate entities, although the difference is slight. A picture rail has a rounded top edge protruding out from the wall, where hooks are often placed. Its main purpose is for hanging pictures. A frieze, on the other hand, is a flat molding, frequently decorated with relief carving or classical profile.

 

The picture rail or frieze and the chair rail form what is known in the Victorian architectural style as a tripartite. The wall is effectively broken up into three separate areas. This type of wall treatment extends your options for decorating considerably.

 

 

Chair Rail Molding

Wall moldings. This group includes the chair rails, and the less common picture rails and friezes. Chair rails are popular features and so can be found throughout many homes. It is the molding that sits approximately 30"-36" above the floor, right at about the height of a chair back. If you choose to panel the wall below, this trim is known as a dado cap.

 

Picture rails and friezes are often confused, while in actuality they are two separate entities, although the difference is slight. A picture rail has a rounded top edge protruding out from the wall, where hooks are often placed. Its main purpose is for hanging pictures. A frieze, on the other hand, is a flat molding, frequently decorated with relief carving or classical profile.

 

The picture rail or frieze and the chair rail form what is known in the Victorian architectural style as a tripartite. The wall is effectively broken up into three separate areas. This type of wall treatment extends your options for decorating considerably.

 

 

Rosettes and Plinth Block Molding

A rosette is a round, stylized flower design, used extensively in sculptural objects from antiquity, appearing in Mesopotamia and used to decorate the funeral stele in Ancient Greece. It was adopted later in Romanesque and Renaissance, and also common in the art of Central Asia, spreading as far as India where it is used as a decorative motif in Greco-Buddhist art.

 

The rosette derives from the natural shape of the botanical rosette, formed by leaves radiating out from the stem of a plant and visible even after the flowers have withered. The formalized flower motif is often carved in stone or wood to create decorative ornaments for architecture and furniture, and in metalworking, jewelry design and the applied arts to form a decorative border or at the intersection of two materials.

 

Rosette decorations have been used for formal military awards. They are also used to decorate musical instruments, such as around the perimeter of sound holes of guitars.

 

 

Picture Frieze

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Baseboard

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Crown

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